Why does my African violet has limp leaves?

Excessively dry or overly wet soil can result in African violet limp leaves. When the potting soil for African violets is too dry, the leaves wilt because they aren’t getting enough water, but African violet leaves also wilt when the soil is too wet. The roots need air as well as water, and soggy soil drowns roots.

Why are the leaves on my African violet drooping?

There may be a couple of reasons why your plant is wilting. It could be that the plant is too dry and needs water. On the other hand, wilting African violet leaves may also be a sign of overwatering. This can occur when the plant is watered too much, especially if the plant is in a plastic pot.

Should you remove dead flowers from African violets?

When removing spent blooms, also remove dead or dying foliage. … Deadhead African violets to encourage more blooms. African violets make useful flowering houseplants since they can bloom for up to nine months per year. They do need the other three months off as a rest period.

Do African violets like to be root bound?

Contrary to what you might have heard, African violets do not like to be root bound. They do, however, like to grow in the right shape and size pot. … If you plant your violet in a pot that is as deep as it is wide, the roots will fill the diameter but will not get down to the lower part of the potting soil.

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How do I know if my African violet has root rot?

Distinguishing Symptoms

  1. Plant topples over at the base. The top part of your African Violet may separate from the root system entirely, though the crown is still intact.
  2. Roots are decayed.
  3. Roots have yellow or yellowish-brown stripes on them.

When should I repot my African violet?

When to Repot Your African Violets

“As the plants grow, they can be repotted into larger pots so that they don’t get too root-bound.” Once your African violet has doubled or tripled the size of your pot and the leaves are starting to wilt, it’s probably time to make the move, says McEnaney.

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