What language is spoken in Cape Town South Africa?

Cape Town Kaapstad (Afrikaans) iKapa (Xhosa) ǁHui !gaeb (Khoekhoe)
First languages (2011)
• Afrikaans 34.9%
• Xhosa 29.2%
• English 27.8%

What is the main language spoken in Cape Town?

English. South African English is spoken in a variety of accents, and is usually peppered with words from Afrikaans and African languages. It was brought to South Africa by the British who declared it the official language of the Cape Colony in 1822.

Do they speak Afrikaans in Cape Town?

According to the 2011 South African census results, approximately 49.7% of Western Cape dwellers speak Afrikaans, and the majority of these speakers are from coloured communities.

Is English Common in Cape Town?

The most common languages in Cape Town are English, Afrikaans and Xhosa. Afrikaans is the most widely spoken home language with more than 40% of Capetonians speaking the language. … English is spoken by most of the locals, however Afrikaans is still the lingua franca in the Northern suburbs and on the Cape Flats.

What is the food like in South Africa?

Today, South Africans enjoy not only beef, but mutton, goat, chicken and other meats as a centerpiece of a meal. On weekends, many South African families have a braai, and the meal usually consists of pap en vleis, which is maize meal and grilled meat.

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Are Afrikaners white?

Afrikaners make up approximately 58% of South Africa’s white population, based on language used in the home.

Distribution.

Province Free State
Afrikaners 214,020
% Afrikaners 89.6%
All whites 238,789

Are Afrikaners and Boers the same?

Boer, (Dutch: “husbandman,” or “farmer”), a South African of Dutch, German, or Huguenot descent, especially one of the early settlers of the Transvaal and the Orange Free State. Today, descendants of the Boers are commonly referred to as Afrikaners.

Is Afrikaans dead or alive?

The Afrikaans language is one of South Africa’s official languages and a large proportion of the local population uses it as their first or second language. It is still taught in schools. … Some believe that Afrikaans is a dying language, however, it remains spoken all over the country and respected for its origins.

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